Do you listen to music at work? Ever wonder how it impacts your productivity?

This infographic by WebpageFX explores the effect of music on productivity and offers some tips for what kinds of music you should play to help you get in the zone and accomplish more each day.

Music and business

If you listen to music at the office, you’re not alone. In fact, 61% of employees listen to music at work to boost happiness and productivity. And it works!

Studies show that 90% of workers perform better when listening to music, and 88% of employees produce more accurate work.

Business owners agree, and 65% of business owners believe that music makes employees more productive. As many as 40% of business owners also believe that playing music can actually increase sales.

Music and your brain

Music stimulates multiple areas of your brain, which is why you might find yourself crying while listening to a sad song or moving along to the beat of a happy tune. Listening to music releases dopamine in the reward center of the brain. Dopamine is the same chemical released when you eat your favorite food or get a new follower on social media, and it can help improve your focus and make you happier.

Listening to music also has a number of health benefits. It reduces stress, decreases pain, and improves immune function. Music therapy has also proven beneficial for dementia patients, as it helps them recall memories and emotions.

Music and productivity

But do different genres of music affect productivity differently?

While ambient noise is great for improving concentration and creativity, pop can help you accomplish tasks more quickly and with fewer mistakes. Classical music is also great for improving accuracy, and dance music can improve proofreading speed by 20%.

Though music can help you get in the zone and drown out noisy distractions at the office, it’s sometimes beneficial to change the station or turn off the music completely.

For example, learning new things requires your brain to remember instructions and facts, and listening to music with lyrics can interfere with your ability to process and retain new information.

In addition, if your job requires deep focus, it’s best to choose familiar songs, since new songs can surprise you and distract you from your job.

 

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